Compassion, Fiery Dragon, and Thorn

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Once upon a time there was a fiery dragon with a thorn on his heart. The thorn was hurting so much that he wouldn’t let anyone near him. When anyone attempted to come nearby, the dragon will breathe out fire and the people would be afraid to come near him and think that the dragon was a nasty being. The dragon felt lonely, not understood, not cared for or loved, continue to pity himself with his wound. At the end, the dragon died lonely and everyone thought that he was a nasty being and he died lonely because of that. No one will ever know that he had a thorn that was hurting him so much…

We all have this story. We all have the thorn and the fire breath. We all have a hurting dragon within. So how do you let people come and help you to get the thorn out? Or how do you as a person, who is trying to come closer, help the fiery dragon with the thorn? Each act requires a deep compassion and courage in order to pass the fear bridge with the desire to understand the each other’s story. From the perspective of the one who is trying to come close, if you have no idea about the thorn, all you see as a fiery dragon that is hurtful….If you as a dragon, don’t take a moment to connect with the pain with the thorn, all you express is your pain in the form of burning and hurtful fire. On this state of disconnectedness you cannot explain the others of your hurt, rather continue to hurt them with your burning fire and keep them at a distance.

This is a story being told and experienced for centuries. We all have the thorn and the persons we keep at a distance with our burning fire. Isn’t it time to get down and dirty with these thorns so that we can put our fire for a good use and not burn anyone else? Isn’t that time to not to be judgmental of each other when we have no idea about what thorns the dragons are carrying? How do we get pass this huge wound that is connecting us through our hurts but not through our love?

I did Tibetan Chud practice (Chud practice is used in Tibet to heal emotional wounds) this afternoon and dedicated to all that is hurting and feeling hurt by others. What I saw was a big black thorn that was hollow inside and that hole was filled with sorrow. That sorrow was the layer underneath of the anger that was sitting on the hot and heated prickly thorns. What it needed to heal was pure love. So I offered pure love as it was intended by the divine. The color of that love was vibrant fuchsia pink. The wound I observed needed apricot paste kind of nectar to heal…

After the session, I looked up the ancient, medicinal uses of apricot. Interestingly enough I found that the apricots were used for treatment of cancer and skin wounds…Both are very telling in this story. I don’t know what your wound needs to heal, nor the persons you are in tug of war war with in similar scenarios of seeking love…What I am offering here is an example and awareness for your ability to tame and heal your dragon…

May you find courage to be still when the thorn is hurting before you breathe the fire out to burn others and yourself as a result of your hurt…May you are able to connect to divine fuchsia love that fulfils the hollow space inside your thorn. May you are able to use the fire breath of your dragon in the forms of creativity through healing your thorn instead of burning others with your pain. May you are able to say goodbye to your thorn, heal your wounds and wounds of others…

Namaste,

Picture credit: http://stuffpoint.com/dragons/image/131408/fiery-dragon-bathe-picture/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fuchsia#mediaviewer/File:Fuchsia_2008.jpg

http://www.tasteofbeirut.com/2013/12/dried-fruit-salad-khoshaf-2/

Tijen

2 thoughts on “Compassion, Fiery Dragon, and Thorn

  1. Very insightful post, thank you. I read the following the other day, which I think fits well with this topic:
    We’re all healing from something.
    Therefore, please be gentle with others.
    You never know if you’re hitting a wound.

    Liked by 1 person

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